Kinetic Bridging ™ Method

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Why Kinetic Bridging changes last

Kinetic Bridging identifies and connects essential neuromuscular stabilization patterns in the manner they should have developed from birth. We guide the body to connect these patterns all by itself by identifying the patterns already present then building from these to establish the missing pieces.

Sensory input is created when the body’s joints are stable and there is a base level of tension present from the connecting muscles. This dynamic tension sends proprioceptive sensory input to the nervous system every time there is a change at the joint. This sensory input should be sent automatically to keep the brain apprised of what is and isn’t going on in the rest of the body.

Kinetic Bridging identifies and connects essential neuromuscular stabilization patterns in the manner they should have developed from birth. We guide the body to connect these patterns all by itself by identifying the patterns already present then building from these to establish the missing pieces.

The changes take place in the parasympathetic nervous system using non-specific motor neurons. The parasympathetic nervous system is the same one that controls our background systems such as respiration, temperature, circulatory and other processes that go on without conscious thought.

How often do I need to follow up?

Follow-up frequency depends upon the age and degree of missed stabilization patterns. Here are some rules of thumbs for different ages:

  • Preschool: every 6-12 months until age 7 when the nervous system is more mature.
  • Pre-Puberty: Annually, or after a significant growth spurt. Growth spurts stress neuromuscular systems and can throw off the balance of function if it was originally compromised. Also when more advanced skills/ranges of function are desired.
  • Teen, Adult: When an issue becomes noticeable again, or when new skill levels/ranges are desired.





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