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How Kinetic Bridging was developed

Initially the work with children revolved around coordination. Over time, specific correlations were observed linking neuromuscular function to cognitive and sensory functions. These common threads led to understanding how neuromuscular stability played a pivotal role among all of these pieces.” The Kinetic Konnections® program was born which uses Kinetic Bridging to obtain results.

An electrical engineer who holds degrees from the Illinois Institute of Technology and Northwestern University, Cara Lindell started her strength training business in 2002. The initial years were challenging, yet insightful as the business co-existed with the needs of her son, Daniel who was concurrently diagnosed with Leukemia. Cara became certified as a personal trainer and worked with clients around her son’s chemotherapy schedule.

Her initial clients included women in their 50s who had recent diagnoses of osteoporosis. Her engineering background kicked in as she began exploring the science of bone density, balance and strength, which led to a special focus on coordination. She began working with clients on a new level blending kinesiology, biomechanical principles and neuroscience to effect meaningful and sustainable changes in strength, stability and coordination.

At the same time Lindell’s work started yielding amazing results for her adult clients, an interest arose in applying the same coordination concepts to children - children who had trouble focusing in school, interacting socially or who had chronic fatigue. Historically these types of coordination gaps these children have been thought to correlate to school performance. The parents often did not believe in drugs to mask to root issues but they had limited alternatives—alternatives involving great commitments of time and money.

The early work with children revolved around exercises and coordination. Over time, specific correlations where observed linking neuromuscular function to cognitive and sensory functions. These common threads led to understanding how neuromuscular stability played a pivotal role among all of these pieces. The Kinetic Konnections® program was born.

Other professionals are quick to look at how people move, but no one really pays much attention to stability. Stability is like the structural frame to a house; it’s not seen but is very important. High performance cars are some of the most stable vehicles, because in order to function at high levels, there needs to be a highly stable system with fine control and quick response. Humans work the same way.

Concurrently Lindell’s son’s cancer went into remission. Her son was a different boy after three years of chemotherapy; Cara knew what she was doing helped other kids, so she started Daniel on the same exercises. After his extensive chemotherapy treatments her son lost 30 points off of his IQ score and now struggled academically and socially. It was the evolving work with her son that led to the basis for Kinetic Bridging™ which Lindell formulated in 2007.

She discovered that the Kinetic Bridging micro-isometric exercises stimulated brain-body connections in unique, fast and lasting ways. Not only did coordination change from improvements in stability, there were profound changes in sensory processing and cognitive skills. Parents were reporting changes in spelling, reading, math, visual processing, attention, social skills and self-confidence.

Distinctive patterns were emerging and in the summer of 2009 Lindell realized optimal changes by following infant developmental sequences to identify and connect the neuromuscular stabilization patterns in the manner they are created from birth. Not only were these patterns necessary at all ages, the body built patterns on its own when the stabilization patterns were developed in this sequence.

The Kinetic Bridging method continues to evolve and it is now being taught to other health practitioners and parents.

 






Why Kinetic Bridging changes last

Kinetic Bridging identifies and connects essential neuromuscular stabilization patterns in the manner they should have developed from birth. We guide the body to connect these patterns all by itself by identifying the patterns already present then building from these to establish the missing pieces.

Sensory input is created when the body’s joints are stable and there is a base level of tension present from the connecting muscles. This dynamic tension sends proprioceptive sensory input to the nervous system every time there is a change at the joint. This sensory input should be sent automatically to keep the brain apprised of what is and isn’t going on in the rest of the body.

Kinetic Bridging identifies and connects essential neuromuscular stabilization patterns in the manner they should have developed from birth. We guide the body to connect these patterns all by itself by identifying the patterns already present then building from these to establish the missing pieces.

The changes take place in the parasympathetic nervous system using non-specific motor neurons. The parasympathetic nervous system is the same one that controls our background systems such as respiration, temperature, circulatory and other processes that go on without conscious thought.

How often do I need to follow up?

Follow-up frequency depends upon the age and degree of missed stabilization patterns. Here are some rules of thumbs for different ages:

  • Preschool: every 6-12 months until age 7 when the nervous system is more mature.
  • Pre-Puberty: Annually, or after a significant growth spurt. Growth spurts stress neuromuscular systems and can throw off the balance of function if it was originally compromised. Also when more advanced skills/ranges of function are desired.
  • Teen, Adult: When an issue becomes noticeable again, or when new skill levels/ranges are desired.





How Kinetic Bridging impacts missed development stages

We commonly read about milestones for motor skills in infant and toddler development. What we may not realize is each of these motor skills depends upon precursor stability patterns. The reason a child may not crawl is because many of the building blocks involved in crawling did not develop. Spending more time practicing crawling will not build these prerequisite skills either.

The majority of prerequisite essential stability patterns develop by 3-4 months of age. The patterns are incrementally developed from birth. Missed or skipped patterns result in compensatory developmental patterns. No two individual’s compensation patterns are the same, although they may have missed the same fundamental pattern. These same essential stabilization patterns are as necessary for three-year-olds, as the 13-, 43- or 93-year-olds.















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